Los Angeles County Coordinating Councils records Edit

Summary

Identifier
0406
Finding Aid Author
Sue Luftschein
Finding Aid Date
2011 June
Description Rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard

Dates

  • 1930 – 1952 (Creation)

Extents

  • 0.84 Linear Feet (Whole)
    2 boxes

Agent Links

Subjects

Notes

  • Preferred Citation

    [Box/folder# or item name], Los Angeles County Coordinating Councils Records, Collection no. 0406, Special Collections, USC Libraries, University of Southern California

  • Conditions Governing Access

    COLLECTION STORED OFF-SITE. Advance notice required for access.

  • Historical note

    Coordinating Councils, or voluntary neighborhood councils interested in community social welfare, were a national phenomenon during World War I. The Councils typically were concerned with the maintenance of community morale, the prevention of juvenile delinquency, and the promotion of wholesome recreation and character-building group activities for young people. As advisory rather than functional bodies, their effectiveness depended on the cooperation of community social service agencies, schools, parent/teacher associations, and law enforcement personnel. In Los Angeles County the first Coordinating Councils were launched in 1932 with the formal sponsorship of the Juvenile Court and the County Probation Office. The volunteer members of the Coordinating Councils attempted to cope with severe community dislocation during two world wars and a prolonged depression.

    This collection include records of both the Los Angeles County Coordinating Councils (renamed the Federation of Community Coordinating Councils of Los Angeles County by the end of the 1940s) and Coordinating Councils, Inc., an organization directed between 1938 and 1944 by four prominent members of the Board of Los Angeles County Coordinating Councils. This Board convened representatives of the more than sixty Councils in Los Angeles County, together with executives of public and private agencies, civic group and service club leaders, religious leaders, recreation workers, school board members, and law enforcement personnel.

    Coordinating Councils, Inc. was incorporated as a research and service organization for the advancement of community coordination. In the six years of its active existence the organization served as a national clearing house for research, assembled a specialized library, published a bimonthly magazine ("Community Coordination") and a well-received manual, and planned and conducted regional, state, and national conferences.

  • Conditions Governing Use

    The use of archival materials for on-site research does not constitute permission from the California Social Welfare Archives to publish them. Copyright has not been assigned to the California Social Welfare Archives, and the researcher is instructed to obtain permission to quote from or publish manuscripts in the CSWA’s collections from the copyright holder.

  • Abstract

    The Los Angeles County Coordinating Councils records document the activities of the Los Angeles County Coordinating Councils (later the Federation of Community Coordinating Councils of Los Angeles County) and Coordinating Councils, Inc., an organization directed by members of the Board of the LA County organization. The records contain meeting minutes, correspondence, and reports, 1930-1952, created by all three organizations, and as such give a detailed view of the activities of these related organizations.

  • Scope and Content

    The Los Angeles County Coordinating Councils records contain minutes, correspondence, and reports, 1930-1952, created by both the Los Angeles County Coordinating Councils (later the Federation of Community Coordinating Councils of Los Angeles County) and Coordinating Councils, Inc. The majority of the records are meeting minutes: of the Executive Board of Los Angeles County Coordinating Councils and the Board of Directors of Coordinating Councils, Inc., and as such give a detailed view of the activities of these related organizations. The Los Angeles County Coordinating Councils records also include voluminous rosters of general and standing committee memberships, county-wide address listings, organizational charts, local area reports, program proposals, research papers, and public relations memoranda. Of particular interest is a 1943 report on the Findings and Recommendations of a Los Angeles County Grand Jury investigating the notorious "Zoot Suit" disturbances, and also a detailed 1941 survey of the 14 most disadvantaged and impoverished sections of Los Angeles, designated as "Less Chance Areas" by the Information Division of the Work Projects Administration, which undertook the study for the Los Angeles County Coordinating Councils. The collection also reflects the efforts of Coordinating Councils, Inc., to finance its activities, which included extensive travel to attend meetings of Coordinating Councils across the country.

Components