Bierce (Ambrose) correspondence collection Edit

Summary

Identifier
0342
Finding Aid Author
Sue Luftschein
Finding Aid Date
2014 March
Description Rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard

Dates

  • 1893-1913, undated (Creation)

Extents

  • 0.42 Linear Feet (Whole)
    1 box

Agent Links

Subjects

Notes

  • Conditions Governing Access

    COLLECTION STORED OFF-SITE: Advance notice required for access.

  • Preferred Citation

    [Box/folder# or item name], Ambrose Bierce correspondence collection, Collection no. 0342, Special Collections, USC Libraries, University of Southern California

  • Abstract

    Letters from Ambrose Bierce to a variety of correspondents, including Samuel Loveman, B.J.S. Cahill, and Burnette G. Haskell. The collection also includes copies of some of Bierce's contracts with Neale Publishing, and pamphlets advertising his "Collected Works."

  • Related Archival Materials

    See also Willard Morse collection on Ambrose Bierce, Collection no. 0136.

  • Conditions Governing Use

    All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the Manuscripts Librarian. Permission for publication is given on behalf of Special Collections as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained.

  • Scope and Content

    Letters from Ambrose Bierce to a variety of correspondents, including Samuel Loveman, B.J.S. Cahill, and Burnette G. Haskell (and one letter from Haskell). The collection also includes copies of some of Bierce's contracts with Neale Publishing, and pamphlets advertising his "Collected Works." Of particular note is Bierce's last letter to Samuel Loveman, in which he indicates he is off to South America and does not know when he will return.

  • Biographical note

    Ambrose Bierce was an American writer, poet, editor, journalist, and satirist. Born in Ohio in 1842, Bierce enlisted in the Union Army and fought at, among others, the Battle of Shiloh. His experiences formed the basis for several stories and his memoir, "What I saw of Shiloh." After the war, he settled in San Francisco and earned a reputation as a contributor and/or editor for a number of local newspapers and periodicals. He spent the years 1872-1875 in England where his first book was published. Upon his return, he traveled throughout the West and worked for a mining company, but when the company failed, he returned to journalism in San Francisco, working for William Randolph Hearst's San Francisco Examiner. Bierce was a biting social critic, and much of his journalistic career was steeped in controversy, but he was also well known for his encouragement of younger writers, such as the poet George Sterling (who is often referred to in the letters in this collection). At the age of 71, Bierce left for South America and disappeared without a trace. His disappearance has become one of the most famous in literary history.

Components